FIG·URE | As humans, we come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. Our figure has made its mark through the ages in a variety of art forms. Our human bodies are made up of the same components, but artists throughout the centuries have used their deft creative skills to capture, reveal, and at times manipulate the various shapes the bodily form possesses. In society, the differences in our forms have created social separations, but figurative art challenges us to see who we are as one human race.                                                                                                                           Can the art of our bodies help us understand we are actually all the same?

FIG·URE | As humans, we come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. Our figure has made its mark through the ages in a variety of art forms. Our human bodies are made up of the same components, but artists throughout the centuries have used their deft creative skills to capture, reveal, and at times manipulate the various shapes the bodily form possesses. In society, the differences in our forms have created social separations, but figurative art challenges us to see who we are as one human race.

                                                                                                                          Can the art of our bodies help us understand we are actually all the same?

No matter how brilliant, amusing or intelligent the creek of abstraction, Dadaism, Minimalism and Conceptualism of the 20th century was, it didn’t much affect the historical river of figuration. I predict that in 50 years and in 300 years, figurative art will still be strong and important.
— Mark Kostabi, American Artist and composer